Where's the Library?

Libraries are not just a place or a thing. Libraries are evolving!

Posts Tagged ‘librarianship’

Reference

Posted by Librarian/Information Professional on September 23, 2012

Interestingly enough the reference questions have been about finding the reserves, checking out books, locating a book on the shelves. Yes, it is a new school year, and this group has not yet learned our system. They will soon and be “old hands” at it.

Since they closed a computer lab, we are busier than ever. Our computers are constantly busy in the evenings, with people waiting to use them. Yes, we have a good crop of “flash drives” left behind.

This afternoon, I have helped someone find a book in the “stacks.” No student knows that term! Also, helped several students find some books; directed some to the circulation desk; explained where reserves are; showed how to use the copy machine; filled up the printers with paper; and the evening is still very young.  Believe it or not, I enjoy reference most of the time. It is one of the more fulfilling jobs in the library, in my estimation. Getting instant feedback for your efforts is always gratifying.

So, if you need some background information on Olympic Games or Beowulf, or need an article about II Chronicles, etc., stop by the reference desk or contact us online!

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Where is the Library?

Posted by Librarian/Information Professional on September 19, 2012

It’s a question that is asked from time to time, yet the library is not just a building. The library can be found online, too. We are accessible. I’m sure you knew that, but people forget that libraries can be used remotely.

As long as you have “privileges” you can use the library from a remote location. That is a ‘life saver” for students and can actually be a “life saver” if the information is critical to your well being. Let’s hope that it is more metaphorically used than actually being out of necessity. See you at the library? Or maybe, you are seeing me at the library now. Maybe not physically, but we are connecting.

The building will close, but the library will stay open for research 24/7.

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September

Posted by Librarian/Information Professional on September 19, 2012

The library “As Place.” Yes, it is true this year, so far. Lots of students. Some just want to print a paper. Some assigned to the library to “study.” Some just “need a book.” (Oh yes, the typical question to approach a librarian and they do really need some help).

Encouraging signs of this new year are some of the assignments. What does this passage of scripture mean? Find a book and some articles. Another assignment, create a list of 20 controversial topics for possible research. The next step? Narrow it down to a topic to write about. These assignments expect the students to find information to support their topic. Then must ask for a book in another library (Interlibrary Loan) They may start with the broad searches, and then narrow down to a specific databases. They get to expand their horizons and to see what can be found. They are learning resources are available and then using them. How about that!!

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It’s June and what to do??

Posted by Librarian/Information Professional on June 7, 2011

Every summer it seems there are so many things that I would like to accomplish, like emptying 2 file cabinets full of old unused materials. Yet it is so hard to get to my projects. It is not for lack of trying. Sometimes it is the lack of time and resources, i.e. available workers, and sometimes it is other people’s priorities. You know the type, they dream up stuff for me to do because I have all this available time. They often are my peers, who convince the right people that this is something that “we” should do. Funny, the “we” is usually me, and my projects get to take a back seat. So far I am waiting on that to happen as it always does, every summer.

So back to the other issue, having the resources to get to my projects. I came back after Memorial Day and my week vacation to discover that I had virtually no workers at all. One worker who had agreed to work found the opportunity to more hours in her home department. That left me with one worker who wanted to work one hour a day! So I dug through the very few applications. Most of the applicants had another campus job and only wanted another hour or so, here or there. No real help for me there! I did see one promising applicant, who informed me that she had just decided to take a job at a summer camp. Lucky me, I now had one worker could give me one hour per day. Since my assistant is out having major surgery, not enough workers!

Fortunately, things have a way of turning out OK. The original worker didn’t get the expected hours, after all, so I now have some excellent help. Wish I could steal her, but that’s not likely.

As I said, things have a way of righting themselves, today one of my academic school year workers walked in wanting to have some hours to work! YEA!! A trained worker!! So now we can, at least, climb out from under the never ending mail! I actually started thinking about emptying those 2 file cabinets again!

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Why Bother?

Posted by Librarian/Information Professional on November 8, 2008

What a negative!! Arrrggghh!! Why do I bother going to library school?? Ever since I first started working in libraries in the 90s, there have been those who have predicted and called for the end of the library. From the so called “wall-less” (http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/AboutLibrary/CUNews/cu_101697.html) libraries to libraries are disappearing and are irrelevant. What is the point if the professionals of the discipline do not see value to libraries and buy into the current trends that all information is available online, so who needs the libraries! While there is some truth to this supposition, it is too simplistic!

Articles such as Ross and Sennyey’s The Library is Dead, Long Live the Library! The Practice of Academic Librarianship and the Digital Revolution, are part of this long trend of devaluing librarianship, and the librarians who buy into it. While this article makes some excellent points about the necessity for libraries to change with the new trends in technology, they make me feel like I should just roll over and play dead and forget library school.

Fortunately, I don’t buy into their total package deal. Under all that hype about publishers and the Internet being all that users care about, I think they miss several important points. With the rapid development of information being available online, it rapidly changes and sometimes disappears. Information on the Web is here today and gone almost as quickly.

Service, is one of the major aspects of librarianship. Filtering all that information for people is part of library services. Whether it is done personally, or through a well designed web page is part of that service.

Collections, is another part of librarianship. Collections are being redefined in the digital age, yet what is here today may not be here tomorrow. Using one of their examples of government documents. Ask most government documents librarians about purls (http://purl.oclc.org/) and document availability. Docs are replaced at the whim of the agencies and may appear, move and disappear as pages are re-designed. Ask about what happened in post 9/11 and the Department of Interior(http://www.doi.gov/)

pages (http://www.ombwatch.org/article/articleview/213/1/104/). Like much of information that libraries provide, the most current information is not always what is needed. Sometimes previous documents are necessary for users. The philosophy being presented in this article and others, is that only the most current information is ever needed. That philosophy defies scholarship and research goals. Changing government information at the whim of the agency director flies in the face of “Freedom of Information” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedom_of_Information_Act) and (http://www.usdoj.gov/oip/index.html), critical to open records access to government in the US.

Additionally, collections should not be totally in the hands of commercial entities as this paper seems to suggest. Commercial entities will provide what is profitable, not what is needed. The “long tail” or “just in case” collections are needed for scholarship and research.

Library as Space, is about the building and its uses. While the authors make some valid points that using the space in different manners call into question the existence of keeping the building, again they do not understand the changing nature of users. Those students who use the library for “study hall” also use the services of the building. By my own observation, users will browse the collection searching for ideas and alternative solutions to their information quests. Granted my experience is in an academic library, haunted by undergraduates, for the most part.

So what is the point? The point is that information professionals are important if they take themselves seriously. While Ross and Sennyey make some valid points about the necessity for changes within the field, they miss the point about what librarianship is all about!

Article cited: Ross, Lyman and Pongracz Sennyey. 2008. The library is dead, long live the library! The practice of academic librarianship and the digital revolution. The Journal of Academic Librarianship 34 no. 2: 145-152.

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